Hudinilson Jr.

Hudinilson Jr.

  • X
  • Untitled
  • Untitled
  • Untitled
  • Untitled
  • X
  • Xerox-Action
  • Xerox-Action
  • X
  • Narcisse - Gesto II
  • Untitled
  • Untitled
  • Untitled
  • X
  • X

Hudinilson Jr.

Hudinilson Jr.

  • Period
  • 17.10 — 09.01.2021

  • Opening
  • 17.10 — 12PM

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • E-mail
  • WhatsApp


the BODY always as principle

collage, mail art, photography,


                  XEROX


THE XEROXED BODY

– using the BODY as the source, by building a special work relationship in the physical contact between idea and the mechanical process; leaning and lying down entirely on the XEROX machine glass plate to create shapes/textures. XEROXING recreates the BODY in its own way, destroying some details and enhancing others, resulting in images that resemble abstraction, in a reading/eyesight exercise. 

– the BODY (mine/male) contained in the space of a XEROX copy becomes a module which juxtaposes or superimposes in a sequence. 

– continuous experimentation with the values offered by the PHOTOCOPYING process will define the individual values of each proposition. understanding the boundaries imposed by the machine and expanding its resources, conquering those boundaries, thereby inverting the relationships, making the machine the medium and coauthor of this work. 



OR ELSE 



the BODY always as principle

collage, mail art, xerox,


                  PHOTOGRAPHY


THE BODY PHOTOGRAPHED

– the transposition of the medium, always using the same source, the BODY (mine/male) exhausting the subject ever more. 

– the particular difference(s) of each machine; the texture and layout typical of xerox media, as opposed to the image of PHOTOGRAPHY.

– the BODY contained within the space of each photogram, focused in the viewfinder of a regular camera and without appropriating any major resources/special effects, becomes a module which juxtaposes or superimposes in a sequence.

– the picture is self-portrait; PHOTOGRAPHING myself by looking for myself through the viewfinder, not relying on other resources, such as mirrors; looking for myself, framing myself up and “taking” the shot; to what extent can my eye, through this mechanical viewfinder, see me; to fragment myself, to split up the body parts, a split which still opposes the division in photocopying, and still, after the photo, to copy it in the photocopier, and thus contrast the different copies; my BODY transmuted.



HUDINILSON JR.  –  1981  –  são paulo  –  sp  –  br

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • E-mail
  • WhatsApp

Vesuvius

Ana Mazzei

  • x
  • x
  • x
  • x
  • Cobra
  • x
  • Casal
  • Casal
  • x
  • x
  • Cenário russo
  • Cenário igreja
  • Templo - Face Norte
  • Templo - Face Norte
  • x
  • x
  • x

Vesuvius

Ana Mazzei

  • Period
  • 26.09 — 09.01.2021

  • Opening
  • 26.09 — 12PM

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • E-mail
  • WhatsApp

First tragedy and ending.

 

The witnesses to the frightening spectacle – whose aspect and form are best represented by no tree other than the Pine – gave a striking account and told as well of the tragic end met by the old man.

Overcome by passion – of science –, he took the train to have a close look at the scary phenomenon, and perished as he came to the aid of his friend.

 

High above the rising flames, a sprawling, dark cloud quickly formed which obscured the sun.

A deluge of rock and incandescent debris befell the city.

Walls and roofs collapsed, and each and every lifeform was destroyed by a wave of water and ash.

In the dark, the apocalyptic scenery was fed by lightning, earthquake, and tsunami; what few fleeing survivors were engulfed by all-encompassing poisonous gases.

This hell lasted three days, and then, absolute silence.

 


The awakening, nineteen centuries later.

 

Everyone’s asleep; cities are being rebuilt in more or less the same places as before.

People fear terrible spells. Thieves and treasure raiders scour everything in sight, and then the place is forgotten and all vestiges are lost. Sixteen hundred years go by before the first objects are found, and another hundred and fifty before the sense of novel discovery emerges.

An ancient door through which the encounter now begins indicates the way, but before reaching the door, one would do well to notice the imposing landscape: to the right are the rich homes of the “insula occidentalis,” to the left the necropolises and the steep paved ramp leading up to the two arches intended for the animals and the carriages that would bring in salt and fish from the sea.

To the south, stupendous columns and a series of decorative paintings take up two rooms in an unforgettable display: as we look around in utter focus, we witness a ritual enacted by 29 actors in an ongoing, solemn, silent scene charged with deep mystery. Slowly, emerging figures, symbols and objects seem to take on life in a new dimension extraneous to sensory reality.

 


The home of the tragic poet.

 

A boy reads through the ritual of the initiated one.

The initiator looks on, a “volumen” on her left.

She who offers a sacrifice addresses the overseer as the servants help her along.

Domestic scene –

A young man plays the lyre, ecstatic with the divine vision.

A young woman plays a flute, and a “satyr” soothes a deer.

Terrified, the initiated one looks back as she witnesses flagellation taking place by the opposite wall.

A group sips water from a big jug as another group showcases a wide-eyed mask.

It’s a wedding day, symbol of unearthly delight.

One initiated woman stands and another one kneels down as they proceed towards the revelation of the “mystica vannus,” i.e. they are about to discover the “phallus.”

A purple-winged divinity flies above the frightened initiated one as she seeks shelter in her merciful companion’s breast.

The final trial: a banquet; the initiated ones dance, happy and free.

The joy of humans dispels all concerns, bringing on sleep and oblivion from everyday misery.

 

The end.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • E-mail
  • WhatsApp