Condo Unit São Paulo

Condo Unit São Paulo

  • Period
  • 07.04 — 12.05.2018

  • Opening
  • 07.04 — 2 pm

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Condo is a collaborative art project organized between galleries that takes place annually in London and New York since 2016. Through a space-sharing model, each edition of the project sees different spaces in the same city receiving guest galleries and artists to occupy their spaces. Condo Unit São Paulo is the first edition of the project to take place in Latin America, where Galeria Jaqueline Martins welcomes: 


KOW (Berlin) 

The gallery presents a selection of works by turkish artist Ahmet Öğüt (1981) during Condo Unit in São Paulo. In Stones to throw, Öğüt departs from nose art, a phenomenon of decorative paintings in the fuselage of combat aircrafts popularized during the Second World War. The installation consists of a set of 10 painted stones reproducing the same type of illustrations used on the noses of military aircrafts. Stones to throw was originally developed for Kunsthalle Lissabon in Portugal and then exhibited as part of the Sydney Biennial in 2014. Throughout the exhibition in Lisbon, 9 of the stones were sent to Diyarbakir, Öğüt’s hometown, one by one and left in the street. What remained at the end of the show was; 10 plinths, only one stone and photos of the other stones located in the streets of Diyarbakir and the FedEx bills. In recent years, a large number of children from Ahmet Öğüt’s home village of Diyarbakir have been arrested for throwing stones at armed military forces. Adorned with images of shark’s teeth and missiles ready to fire, the stones spawn new life - a metaphor of resistance against oppression, highlighting the battle of the small against the great. The presentation will also feature a new video work.. 


Carlos/Ishikawa (London) 

The works by Canadian artist Steve Bishop (1983) presented here are derived from Standard Ballad, an immersive installation that considers the gaps between technology and emotion, and the projection of sentimentality and nostalgia. Inside the installation, in between environments that resembled domestic spaces, there was a 90’s style television set showing a scrolling text against a blue background, something that evokes the late-night brightness, when analog TV signals were down. The text described the artist’s encounter with shoe boxes full of personal belongings, previously hidden in his parents’ house. These boxes contained photographs, cassette tapes, letters from ex-girlfriends and other objects. The shoe boxes, now displayed here next to a bathrobe, are permanently sealed and are displayed at the same height as the cabinet shelf where they were originally stored in Bishop’s parents’ home. The boxes have thus become small coffins of obsolete memories and technologies belonging to a different time from the artist’s personal life and to a different world pre-e-mail, pre-jpeg, pre-digital, pre-mp3. 


Simon Preston (New York) 

Clement Siatous was born in 1947 on the Chagos Islands, a small isolated archipelago in the middle of the Indian Ocean. The entire population of the islands were expelled by the British Government to make way for a US naval base in 1973. Since then, the UK Government was responsible for creating a fiction that a permanent population never existed on the Chagos Islands. This claim was made easier to uphold due to sparse photographic documentation that until recently mainly existed in dispersed military and government archives. As with many evicted Chagossians, compelled to leave their belongings behind, Siatous had no documentation of his heritage. In direct response to the continued political denial, he began to render a counterpoint to this official record. Siatous illustrates his former everyday life in exhaustive detailed canvas, documenting the villages and homes of Chagos as well as its copra and fishing industries. As a further conceptual device, many of the paintings bear the date of a specific memory, not the date of when it was painted. Siatous considers each painting a political act and describes his process as ‘self imagination’, a means of claiming ownership of his own history. 


Nuno Centeno (Porto) 

Portuguese artist Carla Filipe (1973) has a wealth of expressiveness when penetrating the universe of drawing and work on paper that she tackles in her pieces, frequently in installations and artist books. She integrates both public and private aspects in her projects, creating a world that is referential but also mysterious, in which unexpected meanings emerge. Her techniques get away from the lineal format so characteristic of drawing, developing in any part of three dimensional space. 


PM8 (Vigo) 

Spanigh artist Loreto Martínez Troncoso (1978) uses words as vehicles of transmission; words which she transposes to invest them with new meanings and create new situations. Her works are palimpsests in which intertextuality is an instrument for communication, and her actions  manifest themselves in the artist’s physical presence or through devices intended to act as a medium for the text, monologue, discourse or conference. The idea of the audience as the absolute and inalienable addressee without which there is no work (to borrow Rancière’s idea in The Emancipated Spectator) is fleshed out in recent works, where the artist abandons spontaneous intervention and the word is transmited via physical devices such as headphones, projectors and loudspeakers that the spectator activates – maintaining his condition of performer – in his encounter with the work and place at a given time. Absence functions as a transposition of presence, for, as the artist argues, ‘inaction, too, is a form of action’. 


Proyectos Ultravioleta (Guatemala) 

Vivian Suter was born in Buenos Aires in 1949 from immigrant parents. The family returned to her father’s native Switzerland in 1962, and five years later Vivian enrolled in painting classes at the Basel School of Art and Design. When she finished her studies, she traveled and settled in Panajachel, a remote village in Guatemala. Together with her son and mother, the artist Elisabeth Wild, she has lived there with only brief interruptions ever since. Although Suter’s interviews tell us that his paintings are “about wind, rain, volcanoes, and the vastness and clarity of the tropical landscape,” they are clearly not representations of these things. In fact, instead of considering these canvases as works of art (they are not titled or dated), it seems that Suter sees them as physical responses to the circumstances in which they are made. She often says she considers them “abstract and imaginative.” 

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